Categories
Sewing

HST Alphabet – J Mini Quilt

I recently participated in round 2 of the Schnitzel & Boo Mini Quilt Swap, an online swap exchange of handmade mini quilts organized by Kristi McDonough.  I was to make one mini quilt measuring no larger than 24 inches square, based on my secret partner’s preferences.  This is what I made for my partner, Jess, who likes bold, bright colors and geeky retro style.

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

I started with a ton of scraps in a rainbow of colors.  These are all 5 inch squares.

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

I paired up prints with their matching solid color and made a bunch of half-square triangle (HST) units.

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

After trimming, these are my scraps’ scraps 🙂

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

I arranged them on the design wall, according to the HST Alphabet pattern I’m writing. And hey! A quilting ruler doubles as a quilter’s palette!

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

If you’ve read my other HST Alphabet posts, you know I’m a fan of glue basting to match up the points accurately in my seams.  After a bit of tweaking, this is my process:

After stitching up two HSTs to each other, make another set, and place the two pieces right sides together.  Push a pin through their points and find a spot on your ironing board where the pin goes in all the way.  Push it all the way down.

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Lift the top piece a little and put a tiny dot of regular washable school glue above the point.

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Push the pin back down and press the spot right above it with a hot dry iron. After a few seconds, I carefully remove the pin and remove the iron after about 5 more seconds.

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Yesssss. #gluebasting!  Sew the seam, pop open the dried glue spot with your fingers, and press the seam open.

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

And there’s the quilt top!  A little geeky drop-shadowy color goin’ on there.  Jess should like it, right?

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Now to figure how to machine quilt this thing.  Since I have a hard time picturing stuff in my head, I really need a way to visualize the quilting stitches beforehand.  Solution: audition your quilting design with yarn!  I saw this technique on Split Yarn‘s Instagram feed.  Genius!  My design wall is backed with foam core board, so it was easy to strategically place some pins up there and twist yarn around them.

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Time to make the quilting design happen with my sewing machine.

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

And here’s the back, complete with a fun label.  I had to keep my partner’s name a secret until she received the quilt in the mail.

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Stitched fabric scraps onto blank greeting cards – why haven’t I done this before?  Perfect for a little handmade note for my partner.

HST Alphabet - J Mini Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Want to see what I received from my secret partner?

Schnitzel and Boo Mini Quilt

Isn’t it beautiful? It was made by Jenny Mae. She used voile instead of the usual quilting cottons, so it’s super silky soft.  Really, how flippin cool is it that a complete stranger made me something that I absolutely adore?

Schnitzel and Boo Mini Quilt Swap Label

To see what the other folks in the swap made, take a peek at the Mini Quilt Swap Flickr group or peruse through the hashtags on Instagram #makeaquiltmakeafriend and #schnitzelandboominiquiltswap.

Categories
Sewing

Modern Quilt Guild Michael Miller Fabric Challenge – #isew Quilt

As a member of the Modern Quilt Guild, I have the option of participating in various events they organize, including conferences, webinars and challenges.  I found out about the Michael Miller Fabric Challenge through my local guild, the Boise Modern Quilt Guild.  Here’s my entry.  It’s a 17 x 51-inch quilt.

Update: the HST Alphabet is now an available sewing pattern!

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge #isew #mqgfabricchallenge #cottoncouture

I added some Cotton Couture solids to the bundle of prints that I was given: a Spring Couture jelly roll and some white/black/greys.

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge #isew #mqgfabricchallenge #cottoncouture #michaelmillerfabrics

The design is from my HST Alphabet quilt block pattern (under development), and this is the first time I’ve sewn multiple letter blocks together.  I’m sooo glad I tested this out, since I ended up re-designing the drop-shadow on a few of the letters, based on my experience with this project.

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge #isew #mqgfabricchallenge #cottoncouture

Lots of 2.5-inch squares – such possibility.

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge #isew #mqgfabricchallenge #cottoncouture

This was the first time I used my Accuquilt cutter.  I thought I’d see if it would trim my HST (half-square triangle) units….

Trimming HST units with #accuquilt

Yes, yes, a thousand times, YES!  Trimming HST units is my least favorite step of making anything with HSTs, and it just might be that my life has been made a whole lot easier with this gadget.

Trimming HST units with #accuquilt

I threw the quilt blocks on the design wall.  #isew  Yes, yes I do.

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge #isew #mqgfabricchallenge #cottoncouture

Now to fill in the background.  Pile o’ pretty, right there.

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge #isew #mqgfabricchallenge #cottoncouture

I LOVE glue basting HST units.  I did this with the HST Alphabet – S Baby Quilt and am now hooked to this process.  It works for pressed-open seams, folks!

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge #isew #mqgfabricchallenge #cottoncouture #gluebasting

Gotta love a good backside 😉

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge #isew #mqgfabricchallenge #cottoncouture

I stitched some simple diagonal quilting lines in the same direction as the geeky drop-shadow.  I used white Aurifil 50-wt thread on the entire project: piecing and quilting. Worked great. I made some scrappy binding strips from the Spring Couture jelly roll – I really love how it turned out.

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge #isew #mqgfabricchallenge #cottoncouture

And here’s the quilt back.  Absolutely no planning it – I just started sewing fabric pieces to each other.  Definitely not something that I normally do.  I really wanted to use every single piece of fabric given to me for the challenge.

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge #isew #mqgfabricchallenge #cottoncouture

This quilt will definitely live in my sewing studio somewhere, I’m thinking a tablerunner or wall hanging.  Pretty, geeky, handmade.  Love it.

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge #isew #mqgfabricchallenge #cottoncouture

Update: the HST Alphabet is now an available sewing pattern!

Categories
Sewing

Sewing for 18-inch Dolls – a Sewing Project Roundup

This is part of the Sewing Project Roundup Series.  Check out the other posts!

Sewing for 18-inch Dolls - a Sewing Project Roundup by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me


Want to stitch something up for an 18-inch doll?  Dresses, skirts, tops, bottoms, or fun outfits?  Accessories, bags, tents, or sleeping bags?  They’re all represented here! And they are all FREE!!!  Enjoy 🙂

Dresses: 

One Shoulder Dress by Sew Adollable

Free American Girl Doll Dress Pattern by Liberty Jane Patterns

Popover Sundress by Oliver + S

Easy Doll Dress to Sew by Skip to my Lou

Make a Shirt into a Doll Dress by Doll It Up.com

American Girl Dress Pattern by My Cup Overflows

American Girl Dress Tutorial by A Steadfast Life

Boutique Peasant Doll Dress Tutorial by PA Country Crafts

Twirly Lace Doll Dress Pattern by PA Country Crafts

Flutter Sleeve Doll Dress by PA Country Crafts

Sleeve Sweater Dress Tutorial for your AG doll by Finding Pins & Needles

1940’s Tiered Dress by BunnyBear

Everyday Playdress by Love Notions

The Katie Dress Pattern by Sew Like My Mom

Dolly Fairy Tale Dress Pattern by Chickadee Jess via Peek-a-Boo Pattern Shop

Summer Dress by Carpatina Dolls

American Girl Doll Basic Knit Dress Pattern and Tutorial by The Craft Patch

T-shirt Halter Dress by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me (that’s me!)

Bonnie Sundress and Top for 18 in Dolls by Genniewren Designs via Craftsy

 

Skirts:

18-inch Doll Skirt Tutorial by Oliver + S

Patchwork Doll Skirt by Create Kids Couture

Scrap Saver 18″ Doll Skirt by Daydream Doll Boutique

Easy No Sew Denim Skirt for Dolls by Doll Diaries

Floral Skirt with Wide Waistband by Sew Adollable

Peplum Skirt for American Girl Dolls by Sew Adollable

No Pattern Party Skirt by Sew Adollable

Twirly Dolly Skirt by Polka Dot Chair

Easy Doll Maxi Skirt Tutorial by PA Country Crafts

Lace Skirt Tutorial AGD size by SuzyMStudio via Craftsy

Ruffle Skirt Tutorial AGD size by SuzyMStudio via Craftsy

Skater Skirt Tutorial – American Girl Dolls by Sew Adollable

Elegant Doll Skirt by Doll It Up.com

Elastic Band Skirt for Dolls by Doll It Up.com

Resize a Simple Girl’s Tutu for Dolls (or make one from scratch!) by Doll It Up.com

American Girl Tutu Tutorial by Simple Simon & Co

High Low Skirt by Sew Adollable

 

Tops:

Trendy Tank Top by Liberty Jane Patterns

American Girl T-shirt by Liberty Jane Patterns

Easy to Sew Tops for American Girl Dolls by Sew Adollable

18″ Doll Long-sleeved T-shirt Pattern by Peek-a-Boo Pattern Shop

18″ Doll Ruffle Cape Pattern by Strictly Homemade

Dolly’s Old Tyme Baseball Shirt by Dandelions n’ Dungarees

Ruffled Tank Top by Pattern Patti

18 inch Doll T-shirt Tutorial by Second Chance Studio

 

Bottoms:

Easy Shorts Pattern by Sew Adollable

American Girl Doll Ruffle Pants Tutorial by U Create

Tights from a Ladies Sock Tutorial by Daydream Doll Boutique

American Girl Doll Yoga Pants by Peachy Tuesday

 

Outfits:

Luau Outfit by AG Doll Play

Winter Fleece Pants by Strictly Homemade

Winter Fleece Top and Hat by Strictly Homemade

Scrubs by Fun Threads Designs

Scrub Set Accessories by Fun Threads Designs

Scrubs V-neck Top by myagdollcraft.blogspot.com

Scrub Pants by myagdollcraft.blogspot.com

Hospital Mask for American Girl Doll by myagdollcraft.blogspot.com

Doll Clothes Upcycled from New Underwear by Old Days Old Ways

Back to School Outfit – Genius upcycling! by A Doll for all Seasons

Skirt + Top by Sew Mama Sew

DIY American Girl Doll Pillowcase Nightgown by iCandy Handmade

 

Accessories:

Apron Tutorial by Strictly Homemade

Chef Set by Daydream Doll Boutique

Swimsuit Pattern for Dolls by Liberty Jane Patterns

Doll Belt by Liberty Jane via WeAllSew

Arm Cast by Craft Gossip

Dolly Panties by Make It & Love It

Minnie Mouse Ears by Katie J. Designs

 

Bags:

Double Ruffle Doll Purse Pattern by Create Kids Couture

Itty Bitty Poochie Bag by Happy Zombie via Moda Bake Shop

Scrap Saver 18″ Doll Stylish Tote by Daydream Doll Boutique

Matching Backpacks for American Girl Doll and Child by Daydream Doll Boutique

Small Backpack for American Girl Doll by myagdollcraft.blogspot.com

Dolly Duffel Bag Tutorial by Obsessively Stitching

 

Other:

Sleeping Bag and Tent Tutorial for an American Girl Doll by The Frugal Crafter

Doll Sleeping Bag and Pillow Tutorial by Polka Dot Chair

Fat Quarter Doll Quilt Tutorial by Polka Dot Chair via U Create

Sheets/Pillow/Ruffled Pillowcase/Fleece Blanket Tutorial by Ribbonwood Cottage

DIY Felt Campfire & Marshmallows Tutorial by Twin Dragonfly Designs

 

Are your favorites not listed?  Leave a comment to share your favorite projects.

 

Categories
Sewing

HST Alphabet – S Baby Quilt

My friend Lindsie will be having a baby boy any day now.  His name will be Sikorsky, Sky for short.  Time to make another boy baby quilt.  Twist my arm.

The design is from my HST Alphabet quilt block pattern (under development).  Time to test out the letter S!  It ended up how I envisioned: geometric, drop-shadowy, and not so baby-ish that he might want to hang it up on the wall when he gets older.  The finished quilt measures about 46″ by 39″.

HST Alphabet - S Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

I told Lindsie that I was planning to make something for her little guy, and asked if she had any color requests. I knew I’d get definite suggestions, her being a graphic designer and all.  Sure enough, she had her color palette at the ready: blue/turquoise/lime primary and grey as secondary.  Like the HST Alphabet – M Baby Quilt, this quilt has my designed letter block in the middle, surrounded by three rows of half-square triangles, all made from 5″ squares.  So I picked out all the blues and greens from two Robert Kaufman Kona Cotton precut charm square bundles I had on hand: Dusty and Sunrise palettes. These fabric bundles are soooo handy!

HST Alphabet - S Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Then matched up the colors to stitch up some HST units.  Oy, those colors!

HST Alphabet - S Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Then trimmed each HST to be exactly 4″ square.

HST Alphabet - S Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

I threw the letter S design on the design wall, and spent quite a bit of time arranging color placement.  I didn’t go for random placement on this one.

The solid white/greys/black are courtesy of the Kona Cotton Silent Film palette by Robert Kaufman, something I always have on hand (thanks, Fat Quarter Shop!)

HST Alphabet - S Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

I kept the rows in order with some fabric scraps and pins.

HST Alphabet - S Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Then stitched them all together.  Glue basting is my new friend.  I like HST seams pressed open and glue basting works that!

HST Alphabet - S Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

The really cool thing about sewing with solid fabrics in a semi-random way, is that you get to see so many cool color combos.

HST Alphabet - S Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: gotta like a good backside 😉

HST Alphabet - S Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

For the back I used grey Widescreen by Carolyn Friedlander via Robert Kaufman Fabrics.  I used Kona Pepper for the binding, using the leftover binding strips to frame up a little quilt label.

HST Alphabet - S Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Wash and dry time.  Because of the contrast of all the color with the bright white of the letter, I made sure to wash it with a few color catchers to prevent any color bleeding.

Oh, the crinkle.

HST Alphabet - S Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Rolled up and wrapped with a camo ribbon. Perfect.

HST Alphabet - S Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

 

Categories
Sewing

HST Alphabet – M Baby Quilt

My sewing bud Claire recently had a baby boy whose name begins with M. Time to make a baby quilt. Twist my arm. We quilters LOVE making baby quilts.

Also, I’m developing a HST Alphabet quilt block pattern, and this was a great excuse to test out the letter M!

HST Alphabet - M Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

The blue and green half-square triangles (HST) are made from 5″ squares, pre-cuts from the Moda Fabrics Grunge fabric collection.  The solid white/greys/black are by  Robert Kaufman Fabrics – the Kona Cotton Silent Film precut charm square bundle is perfect for this!  I always have these on hand, stocking up at the Fat Quarter Shop.

HST Alphabet - M Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Gotta love a good backside 🙂

HST Alphabet - M Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Yes!  I think the design works! I followed my design for the letter itself, and then I randomly placed HST units around it, three rows deep on all sides. A little geometric, drop-shadowy, and masculine without being too baby-ish.  Who knows, maybe after he’s used it as a baby quilt, he’ll display it on his bedroom wall. The finished quilt measures about 46″ by 43″.

HST Alphabet - M Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

I looooooooovvvvvveeeee quilting with my Juki.  Such a smooth process.  I still need to name her!

HST Alphabet - M Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

For the back, I used grey Widescreen by Carolyn Friedlander via Robert Kaufman Fabrics.  I love how the geometric quilting looks on the back.  Having a subtle all-over print or a solid is a good way to make the letter stand out.

HST Alphabet - M Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Ah, the crinkle that comes after washing and drying is sooo good. Awesome texture.

HST Alphabet - M Baby Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me

Claire (@sewingoverpins) shared a photo of her little fella on Instagram on his brand new quilt!  What a sweetheart.

Categories
Sewing

Denim Tartan Quilt

Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on some links.

I finally made something with the old denim jeans I just can’t seem to throw away!  It’s a napping quilt for my Dad for his 65th birthday 🙂

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

Two very large bins of old jeans have been sitting in my garage for years, waiting to be upcycled into something cool. My goal: make a denim quilt for my Dad. My sis and I made one for Mom several years ago, and he has adopted it as his own.  He loves how heavy and warm it is.  Mom’s is backed in floral flannel, but Dad’s is to be backed with buffalo plaid flannel, like his favorite hunting shirts.

I scoured the internet for some quilt inspiration, even creating a Denim Pinterest Board.  I pinned some interesting quilts and some other projects, but then stumbled upon this Tartan quilt project in Transparency Quilts, a book by Weeks Ringle and Bill Kerr of Modern Quilt Studio.  I HAD to make this in denim.  Was I crazy?  Look at all those matching points – will I be able to accomplish that in denim?  I was a little nervous, but I couldn’t get this pattern out of my head.  I had already accepted this mental challenge to myself.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

I went out to the garage to see if I had enough color variations in my jeans inventory – the pattern calls for six values of blue.  I was able to come up with five.  Good enough.  I rounded up a bunch of jeans and arranged them ombre-style.  Yep, good color variety.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

Following are the colors I used, along with the jeans quantity.  I had quite a bit of leftover denim that I can use for other projects on my denim Pinterest board.

  • A (light): 4 pairs of jeans
  • B (light-med): 2 pairs of jeans
  • C (medium): 6 pairs of jeans
  • E (dark): 3 pairs of jeans
  • D/F (very dark): 1 pair of jeans

I ordered 7 yards of this super-soft buffalo plaid flannel from fabric.com and threw it in the washing machine and then the dryer.  Once dry, I gave it a good spray starch and press with the iron.  The starch added some stiffness to the flannel, making it easier to manage and to remain wrinkle-free when layering with the denim.

For a complete listing of the tools and materials I used to make this project, check out my Denim Tartan Quilt Supplies list on Amazon.

Time to cut into some jean!  Buh-bye, 80s jeans.  I used my Fiskars Amplify shears to easily cut all the bulky seams away.  I was really surprised that my hand wasn’t sore after all that cutting.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

And dude! When you cut the seams off 80s jeans you get the guy from Despicable Me!

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

Once the bulky seams and pockets were removed, I gave them a good steam press with my iron.  Following the pattern for the napping size quilt, I cut the denim pant legs to size using my rotary cutter, acrylic ruler, and mat.  My only variation from the pattern was to cut the top/bottom/side panels to be 6 inches wide (not 3 inches), since I wanted the quilt a little bigger.

How perfect is it that the pattern requires long strips of fabric?  Hellllo, pant legs!

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

I put the strips up on my design wall – I think I’m going to like this!

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

Time to stitch the strips into panels.  My Juki sews denim like. a. champ.  I used a 16 Jeans sewing machine needle and a 35 weight thread by Coats & Clark in light gray, a 65% polyester/35% cotton blend. My magnetic seam guide helped keep my stitching straight and at a consistent 1/4 inch.  Also, I used my sewing machine’s walking foot for this entire project.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

I stitched up four panels of pieced denim.  Then I pressed the seams open, since I didn’t want any bunched-up denim bulk to hinder the quilting stitches later on.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

Would Dad approve of my squaring method?  Yes, yes he would.  Using an L-square, I made sure one side was cut perfectly straight…

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

…then cut into columns using my rotary cutter. I really like the way this pattern is written: the small panels and columns are very easy to manage while sewing and pressing. For most of the project, the length of the pieces fit on my ironing board, which was nice and easy.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

I put the top half on the design wall, using the pattern layout as a guide. Cool. My new Instagram friend Chris Thompson (nyc_christopher) proclaimed “this is epic!”  That sure made me smile.

Now for the part I was nervous about: stitching the columns together and matching the points of all those square and rectangle shapes.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

No problemo!  I used new, sharp quilting pins and this Pinning the Seam Intersections tutorial by Quilt Jane.  Since the seams were pressed open, this method worked great at not only matching the points, but keeping the open seams allowances in place until right before they get stitched. No shifting seams under the presser foot!  Sharp pins are key to this process – I didn’t realize how dull my other sewing pins were until I tried to use them on this denim.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

Another key to this project is realizing that not all denim behaves the same.  It’s an easy fix to make the points match in the blunder below, it just takes a little extra time.  I thought I was careful to exclude any stretchy denim, but this sneaky culprit somehow passed QA!  Stretchy denim = saying bad words.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

Uber-helpful when pressing denim seams: a pressing block and a steam iron, extra steam.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

The quilt top is done!

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

I’m digging the wrinkly worn areas.  Adds character.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

Gotta love a good back side 😉

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

Now to sandwich the three quilt layers together. I taped the flannel to the kitchen floor (wrong side up), layered on cotton batting (Warm & Natural by Pellon), and followed this Spray Basting video tutorial by kelbysews.  I went a little heavier on the 505 basting spray on the denim, just in case it needed extra-sticking power.  It worked great.  Since I wasn’t enthused about putting a ton of safety pins through the thick denim, I opted for basting spray.  It was a good choice.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

Machine quilting time.  Using the straight seams as a guide, I used a Hera marker to mark simple horizontal and vertical quilting lines.  It basically marks a sharp crease on the fabric. I wondered if it would show up well on the denim.  It did!  I used a 3.0 stitch length, a 18 Jeans sewing machine needle, and a 30 weight mercurized cotton thread by Coats & Clark in slate gray.

I’m not going to lie – it was a bit of a workout to maneuver this thing through the sewing machine.  But I just stitched slow and steady, making sure the layers didn’t drag over the table, affecting the quality of the quilting stitches.  I felt way more confident about the whole quilting process after going through Creative Quilting With Your Walking Foot class on Craftsy.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

Time for binding.  I chose Pepper Kona cotton solid, a quilting cotton made by Robert Kaufman Fabrics.  I spray-starched the fabric and then followed the binding directions in the Transparency Quilts book.  This binding is applied completely by machine.  No hand sewing, folks!  I love how quick it was, the simple application, how durable the binding will be in the washer/dryer, and the results are stellar.  This is my new go-to binding method. Love it.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

Last step: a quilt label.  I applied interfacing (Pellon SF101) to the back of a scrap of white cotton fabric and ironed a couple of freezer paper squares to the back, giving a good surface for signing the fabric.  I used a black marker (Pentel Gel Roller for Fabric), peeled off the freezer paper backing, stitched on some of the leftover binding for borders, and hand-stitched it to the back.

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

I machine washed and dried the quilt, rolled it up, and tied it with leftover buffalo plaid selvages. So excited to give this to my Dad!

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

With every year, my Dad gets a little sweeter and more sentimental.  He got teary-eyed reading the quilt label.  My Instagram bud Chris Warnick (frecklemama) said “When you can get a big ole bear to tear-up, the whole world wins.”

Yes, yes it does.  I win with my satisfied happy upcycly feeling you get from making something, and Dad wins with his “levi blanket” 🙂

Denim Tartan Quilt by Angela Bowman of www.AngelaB.me #upcycling

Now it’s your turn – use those jeans you’ve been hoarding, or take a trip to the thrift store to get some.  For a listing of all the tools and supplies I used to make this project, check out my Denim Tartan Quilt Supplies list on Amazon. I’m helpful like that!